Cover of Zen Texts
ISBN: 
1-886439-28-1
Publisher: 
BDK America
Pages: 
328
Publish Date: 
2005
Format: 
Hardcover
Author(s): 
Huangbo Xiyun; Myøan Eisai; Eihei Dōgen; and Keizan Jōkin
Translator(s): 
John R. McRae; Gishin Tokiwa; Osamu Yoshida; Steven Heine

Overview

This one volume brings together Huangbo Xiyun's Essentials of the Transmission of Mind (Ch’üan-hsin fa-yao), Myōan Eisai's A Treatise on Letting Zen Flourish to Protect the State (Kōzengokokuron), Eihei Dōgen's A Universal Recommendation for True Zazen (Fukanzazengi), and Keizan Jōkin's Advice on the Practice of Zazen (Zazenyōjinki). Four works complete in one volume.

Four masters explain what matters in Zen practice
Format: 
Hardcover
9.5 x 6.6 x 1.4
$50.00
+ shipping

About

This volume collects the following texts:

Taishō 2012A

Volume 48

Essentials of the Transmission of Mind

Essentials of the Transmission of Mind records the teachings of Huangbo Xiyun, the founder of the Huangbo branch of the Chan School in China, and was compiled by one of his lay disciples, Peixiu. This work sets forth with extreme concision the substance of Chan. Xiyun was the teacher of Linji Yixuan (Jpn. Rinzai Gigen), the founder of the Linji (Jp. Rinzai) School, and as a result this record of his teachings has been frequently referred to in China and Japan as a work expounding the fundamentals of the Linji School of Chan. Huangboshan in the title refers to Mt. Huang-bo, the mountain where Xiyun lived, and Duanji was his title as a Chan Master.

Source
Ch. Huangboshan Duanji chanshi chuanxin fayao (黄檗山斷際禪師傳心法要), compiled by Pei-xiu. 1 fascicle.

Taishō 2543

Volume 80

A Treatise on Letting Zen Flourish to Protect the State

A Treatise on Letting Zen Flourish to Protect the State is a treatise advocating that the recognition of Zen as an independent Buddhist school was necessary for both the sake of Buddhism and the prosperity of the state. The author, Eisai, had transmitted the Rinzai (Ch.: Lin-ji) School of Zen to Japan, but in doing so he met with strong criticism from the Tendai and other traditional schools of Buddhism. In reply he composed this work, emphasizing that the propagation of Zen was in fact equivalent to protecting the land of Japan. The work consists of ten chapters, with all discussions supported by quotations from Buddhist scriptures. A short biography of Eisai by an unknown author has also been added as an introduction.

Source
Jp. Kōzen gokoku ron (興禪護國論), composed by Eisai. 3 fascicles.

Taishō 2580

Volume 82

A Universal Recommendation for True Zazen

A Universal Recommendation for True Zazen was written in 1227 by Dōgen, the founder of the Japanese Sōtō School of Zen, immediately after his return to Japan from China. It elucidates the true significance of zazen (sitting meditation) and emphasizes the importance of its practice. Dōgen considered zazen not to be a means for attaining enlightenment but to be in fact the whole of Buddhist practice, and maintained that practicing zazen was equivalent to the very state of a buddha. Written to spread his ideas on zazen in their undiluted form, the work formed the basis for the establishment of the Sōtō School. A short work, consisting of a mere 786 characters, its contents are said to reveal their meaning only over time.

Source
Jp. Fukan zazengi (普勧坐禪儀), composed by Dōgen. 1 fascicle.

Taishō 2586

Volume 82

Advice on the Practice of Zazen

Advice on the Practice of Zazen was written by Keizan Jōkin, of the Japanese Sōtō School of Zen, who is also known by the honorific title of “Great Founder” (Jp. Taiso) and was the founder of Sōji-ji Temple. The work discusses the purpose and significance of Zazen as well as giving concrete advice for the actual practice of Zazen, and is an indispensable work for all monks of the Sōtō School. It deals with extremely practical matters such as the importance of moderation in eating for regulating one’s physical condition, and strictly admonishes against wearing extravagant or soiled clothing and indulging in such recreational activities as singing, dancing, and music. In addition, it also goes on to make clear that Zazen as practiced in the Sōtō School does not correspond to only “meditation” as included in the “Three Disciplines” of precepts, meditation and wisdom, but embraces in fact all three of these disciplines.

Source
Jp. Zazen yōjin ki (坐禪用心記), composed by Keizan Jōkin. 1 fascicle.

Table of Contents

A Message on the Publication of the English Tripiṭaka   NUMATA Yehan    v
Editorial Foreword    MAYEDA Sengaku    vii
Publisher’s Foreword    Francis H. Cook    ix


Zen Texts

Essentials of the Transmission of Mind

Contents 3
Translator’s Introduction    John R. McRae    5
Text of Essentials of the Transmision of Mind 9

A Treatise on Letting Zen Flourish to Protect the State

Contents 45
Translator’s Introduction    Gishin Tokiwa    47
Text of A Treatise on Letting Zen Flourish to Protect the State 59
Appendix: List of Works Cited 193
Notes 211

A Universal Recommendation for True Zazen

Translator’s Introduction    Osamu Yoshida    241
Text of A Universal Recommendation for True Zazen 251

Advice on the Practice of Zazen 

Translator’s Introduction   Steven Heine   259
Text of Advice on the Practice of Zazen 263


Glossary 277
Bibliography 287
Index 291
A List of the Volumes of the BDK English Tripi
aka (First Series)
 

Background